Richard Randall's Studio

Mt Coot-tha

A long way from its original home in South Brisbane, this little 1901 Federation style cottage studio was purpose built for prominent local artist Richard Randall by his Immigration Agent father George.

For five short years he painted, taught and exhibited at this studio until his untimely death in 1906 at the age of 37. His grief-stricken father took possession of the 800 or so works stored in the studio and offered them as a collection to any corporation who would look after and house them. The then South Brisbane City Council took up the offer and for a while they were kept on the upper floor of the South Brisbane Library until the takeover by Greater Brisbane Council in 1925. Only about 150 of these works are still in council hands today.

Threatened by state government demolition in 1988, the studio was saved and moved 300m away by the BCC and with further road widenings and works in the South Brisbane area was finally removed to its new home at the Gardens where it is now a venue for hire.

Richard Randall's Studio

150 Mt Coot-tha Rd

Mt Coot-tha

Map

150 Mount Coot-Tha Rd, Toowong, Queensland

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